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limbaugh, and rush understood what it was too opinionated freely on the airwaves when he was in sacramento california he had to live under the fairness doctrine guidelines. when he located in sacramento he told me that it was amazing there was nobody doing political talks and he said this is a cakewalk, what form this is going to be. then he had to succumb to the fairness doctrine by giving an hour of a program to somebody in this community concerned about what he said so he had to move over and he says it was the most boring hour of retial i have ever done in my life and that is what was happening back then. there was no question about it. what we saw immediately was all of a sudden we could put commentators on the radio and have three opinions on the radio. we didn't have to act as moderator's anymore. talk radio was so boring in the 1980's you could report or lost ought or report any kind of matter like that. put it was share your favorite recipes -- there were some good programs. i don't want to denigrate talk radio back in. there was worse williams and sally jessy raphael and they did
. >> guest: but immediately the first one out of the gate was rush limbaugh, and rush fully understood what it was to be able to opinionate. he had to live under the fairness doctrine guidelines when he located in sacramento, he told me that it was amazing that there was nothing doing political talk and he said oh, this is a cakewalk, my word, what fun this is going to be. then he had to succumb to the fairness doctrine by giving an hour of a program to somebody in the community who was concerned about what he said so he had to move over and it was the worst most boring hour of radio i'd ever done in my life and that's what was happening back then. there was no question about it. what we saw immediately was all of a sudden we could put commentators on the radio and have free opinions on the radio. we didn't to have act as moderators anymore. talk radio was so boring in the 1980s you could report your lost dog or you could, you know, report any kind of a matter like that. but it was -- share your favorite recipes. there were some good programs. i don't want to denigrate talk radio back then.
-american comedian can stand at the white house correspondents' dinner and wish rush limbaugh did and she gets laughed out, she doesn't lose gabus, even the president of the united states laughs at that so this is the environment we are dealing with. >> guest: it is very hypocritical, and as you noticed rush did not comment on that. he didn't need to. it tells the full story of the far left really wants for america and they don't want conservative views. the heat conservative views and they want to absolutely kill conservative views around america. therefore they allow for the talk-show hosts. >> host: now we are talking about soft censorship. let's talk about this car censorship you write about. do you think this democratic president with big majorities in the congress will go at a full frontal reinstitution of the fairness doctrine or will the approach it from a different angle? >> guest: if they do, they can expect 80 party that is incredulous. laughter, it will be the biggest tea party the nation has ever seen. >> host: you ain't seen nothing yet. >> guest: know, they are not going to go t
of the most interesting things. rush limbaugh has decided, and i've seen it elsewhere, as well. his listeners are actually better informed according to pure research than average mainstream liberals. and by the way, something else liberals don't know, is that conservatives are more giving in their -- more charitable. there was the guy from syracuse who did a book about it which, in fact, got no attention from the mainstream press because it ran counter to the liberal narrative. >>host: something else curious. there are older than the average audience of liberals. people who are older have a better background in popular culture. they know old books. they read. they came of a culture that did not have as much, a barrage of television. >>guest: that is absolutely true. you are talking about young people by and large. they came of age in a highly politicized educational system. something else we deal with in the book. as one woman said, to despair about the education raunch of and marketing. it does from the exploitation of the indians to slavery. it's basically skips the founding fathers. it ski
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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